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2015 Founders' Award of the British Zeolite Association2015 Founders' Award of the British Zeolite Association

Matt Cliffe, a DPhil student in the Goodwin group, has been chosen to receive the 2015 Founders' Award of the British Zeolite Association "for his work in the synthesis and characterisation of defective MOF materials". The Founders' Award is an annual award for UK based postgraduate students working in the area of micro or mesoporous science. In the BZA's own words "It aims to celebrate the best/most promising postgraduate scientist of the year". The Award, which consists of a trophy and a cash prize, will be presented to Matt at the BZA Annual Meeting in Chester, where Matt will present a lecture on his prize-winning work. Congratulations Matt!

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Professor Ben Davis has been elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society Professor Ben Davis has been elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society

Professor Davis is noted for his chemical interrogation and manipulation of biological systems, particularly those that hinge on carbohydrates and proteins. He has developed selective and benign bond forming strategies that have been applied to biology, allowing the construction of synthetic biomolecules and bioconjugates; the creation of synthetic cells and viruses; and in vivo chemistry. These have enabled associated mechanistic details of protein and sugar biology to be elucidated and exploited for biotechnological applications.

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Defect engineering highlighted by Chemistry WorldDefect engineering highlighted by Chemistry World

A recent PCCP article by Matt Cliffe and Josh Hill, both DPhils in the Goodwin group, has been highlighted by Chemistry World. Their results have shown how the mechanical properties of a metal-organic framework (MOF) can be controlled and optimised by varying defect concentrations. Working together with collaborators at Diamond and Paris, Matt and Josh have used their approach to design a defective MOF that not only shrinks when heated, but breaks a number of records in the process.

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European Prize for Organometallic Chemistry to Professor Malcolm L. H. GreenEuropean Prize for Organometallic Chemistry to Professor Malcolm L. H. Green

Professor Malcolm Green has been awarded the first the European Prize for Organometallic Chemistry created by the Division of Organometallic Chemistry (DOM) of the European Association of Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS). Malcolm L. H. Green, Emeritus Professor receives this prize for his outstanding contributions to the field of organometallic chemistry including pioneering studies of molybdenocene and tungstenocene systems, novel methods for molecular inorganic synthesis, for catalysis and for carbon materials as well as fundamental studies of alpha- and beta-hydrogen migratory insertions and C-H bond activations – the well-established term agostic interaction was conceived by Professor Green.

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On the cover of OrganometallicsOn the cover of Organometallics

A research paper by Sebastian Pike et. al. from the Professor Weller research group has been highlighted no the cover of the ACS journal Organometallics. The work shows the solid–gas catalysis of alkene hydrogenation by crystals of large anion protected Rh phosphines. Experiments found that the heterogeneous solid–gas catalysis had most active sites sitting near the surface. The cover illustration was produced by Karl Harrison.

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Mr Xiaofei Zhou wins Chinese government award Mr Xiaofei Zhou wins Chinese government award

Compton group D.Phil. student Mr Xiaofei Zhou wins Chinese government award for outstanding self-funded students abroad. An award ceremony was held at the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in London on Friday April 24th for the 32 UK based winners of this prestigious competition which was inaugurated in 2003. Xiaofei Zhou was presented with a certificate (and cheque) by the Ambassador Liu Xiaoming. Professor Richard Compton delivered a short invited speech on behalf of all the supervisors.

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Oxford Science Blog highlights 'silly walks' researchOxford Science Blog highlights 'silly walks' research

Research by the Kukura group recently published in eLife was highlighted by the Oxford Science blog. The study describes the application of a new high-speed nanometric imaging technique to study how molecular motors move along actin filaments. The work shows that myosin 5 takes 'stiff-legged' steps to achieve highly efficient motion on the nanoscale. The results are important both for our general understanding of efficient mechanochemical transduction and any future efforts in producing artificial nanomachines.

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On the cover of the Journal of Chemical PhysicsOn the cover of the Journal of Chemical Physics

Research by the Doye group has featured on the cover of the Journal of Chemical Physics. The work probes the structural properties of bulges in DNA duplexes, and the cover image represents a variety of DNA nanostructures in which this motif is used.

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Dalton Transactions Poster Prize for Christopher Wright at Southern Dalton Meeting 2015Dalton Transactions Poster Prize for Christopher Wright at Southern Dalton Meeting 2015

Congratulations to Christopher Wright, from the Professor Dermot O'Hare group for winning a poster prize at the Southern Dalton Meeting 2015 in Brighton for his poster on "Well-defined tungsten catalysts for selective ethylene oligomerisation". The Southern Dalton Regional meeting is on all aspects of inorganic chemistry.

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Congratulations to Alavi-Mandell award winnerCongratulations to Alavi-Mandell award winner

Dr Rebekka Hueting has recently been given the Alavi-Mandell award for the publication of an article in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine entitled 'A Comparison of the Behaviour of 64 Cu-acetate and 64 Cu-ATSM in vitro and in vivo' The award is given to individuals who were trainees/students at the time the work was carried out and made a major contribution to the completion of the project. Rebekka, the first author of the paper published in the JNM, was a DPhil student in the chemistry department under the joint supervision of Prof J. Dilworth and Prof V. Gouverneur; this study was conducted in collaboration with Prof. Ruth Muschel (Oncology).

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Nature Chemistry paper highlighted in SynformNature Chemistry paper highlighted in Synform

Work from Martin Smith and Robert Paton’s groups on the catalytic enantioselective synthesis of indanes, which was recently published in Nature Chemistry (http://t.co/aA1h1j1bRw) has been highlighted in Synform. The article describes the development of a kinetically controlled 5-endo-trig reaction directed by a chiral ammonium counter-ion and detailed quantum calculations to probe the potential mechanism of the transformation.

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On the cover of RSC's AnalystOn the cover of RSC's Analyst

A paper by Enno Kaetelhoen and Richard Compton entitled "Testing and validating electroanalytical simulations " is featured on the cover of The Analyst (issue no 8, April 15th 2015). In the paper the authors address approaches towards testing electrochemical simulation software. The artwork is by Enno.

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Hot article in Angewandte ChemieHot article in Angewandte Chemie

Recently published work from Peter Clark in the Dixon Group has been highlighted by the editors of Angewandte Chemie as a ‘hot article.’ The paper describes the discovery of LP99, the first epigenetic BRD7/9 probe to be developed. In addition to cellular inhibition of these proteins, LP99 has been used to reveal a previously undemonstrated role of BRD7/9 in inflammation pathways.

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RSC Poster Prize for Sophie Gearing at BCA 2015RSC Poster Prize for Sophie Gearing at BCA 2015

Congratulations to Cooper group student Sophie Gearing for winning an RSC CrystEngComm poster prize at the British Crystallographic Association Meeting in York for her poster “Does it Crystallise?”, which reported studies of crystallinity in a set of molecular materials.

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Professor RJP WilliamsProfessor RJP Williams

Professor Bob Williams died last week at the age of 89 after a short illness and period in hospital. He was one of the most eminent chemists in the history of our department – a true pioneer of the field of bio-inorganic chemistry especially concerning the role of calcium as a biological messenger, and contributed substantially to our understanding of the evolution of life – and he will be greatly missed as a colleague.

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Highlighted in Nature PhysicsHighlighted in Nature Physics

Research by the Kukura group has been published and highlighted in Nature Physics. The study provides new insight into the mechanism of singlet exciton fission, the process responsible for quantum efficiencies greater than 100% in some organic semiconductors when used in photovoltaics.

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On the cover of Dalton TransactionsOn the cover of Dalton Transactions

This issue of Dalton Transactions was a special themed issue including papers from September 2014 event Dalton Discussion 15. The meeting included a celebration of the work of Professor Jon Dilworth and where he was presented RSC's Becquerel Medal. The main event at the meeting was his celebration by the RSC Radiochemistry group and his plenary after he received the medal The day and issue highlights – Metal ions in medical imaging: optical, radiopharmaceutical and MRI contrast. The cover was designed by Karl Harrison.

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On the cover of Biophysical JournalOn the cover of Biophysical Journal

Research by the Doye group on modelling RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement has featured on the cover of Biophysical Journal. The cover image shows the invading blue strand displacing the green incumbent strand from the red substrate strand. The article has also featured on the Biophysical Society's blog.

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RJP Williams Lecture 2015RJP Williams Lecture 2015

The RJP Williams Lecture 2015 was presented on 10th March by Professor Matthew Rosseinsky FRS, University of Liverpool. His talk was entitled “Identification of New Functional Materials - Integration of Experiment and Computation?" Pictured: Professors Matthew Rosseinsky (centre), Philip Mountford (right) and Simon Clarke (left).

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Group 12 members unite!Group 12 members unite!

Recent work from Matt Blake in the Mountford group, in collaboration with Nik Kaltsoyannis at UCL, has been highlighted in Chemistry World. A new complex containing a Zn–Hg–Zn unit is the first example of a bond between two different group 12 metals. This metal chain is also the first example of catenation between group 12 elements other than just mercury. It is also a rare instance of zinc in the +1 oxidation state.

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TV: BBC Oxford News, BBC 1 South (Oxford)TV: BBC Oxford News, BBC 1 South (Oxford)

A report says researchers at Oxford University have found a way of producing the taste of grapefruit by using another fruit – the orange. Until now it has taken around 400,000 kg of grapefruits to produce 1kg of the compound needed for the grapefruit taste. As oranges are more plentiful and cheaper, the new process is far more commercially viable. The report includes interviews with Jason King and Jan Rees from the University spin-out company, Oxford Biotrans.

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VIP in Angewandte ChemieVIP in Angewandte Chemie

A paper on "caterpillar track complexes" by Shiqui Liu, Dmitry Kondratuk, Sophie Rousseaux and coworkers has been designated as a VIP in Angewandte Chemie. Two wheel-like templates work together to direct the synthesis of a nanoring, and their rotation is synchronized in the resulting 2:1 caterpillar track complex.

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Hot article in Angewandte ChemieHot article in Angewandte Chemie

Recently published work from Joe Abdalla in the Aldridge group has been highlighted by the editors of Angewandte Chemie as a ‘hot article’. The paper describes the use of Group 13 element complexes for E-H bond activation and for the catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to a methanol derivative.

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Oxford SBM team wins 2nd prize National Retrosynthesis Competition 2015Oxford SBM team wins 2nd prize National Retrosynthesis Competition 2015

Minh Tran, Yao Shi and Steve Mansfield, 1st year DPhil students from the Synthesis for Biology and Medicine CDT, have won 2nd prize in the National Retrosynthesis Competition 2015, held at the Royal Society of Chemistry HQ, Burlington House, on 27th February. Competing against nine other teams from UK universities and industry, the Oxford SBM team performed exceptionally well against high quality teams of other PhD students and postdocs, all presenting their retro- and forward synthetic routes for Alistonitrine A. For the brevity of their synthesis route, feasibility in forward synthesis, elegance and style of presentation, the team brought home a well-deserved 2nd prize trophy (pictured), as well as a Da Vinci 1.0 Desktop 3D Printer (donated by Chemglass).

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Vote for our student video entryVote for our student video entry

Moses Moustakim and Tom Fleming (first year DPhil Organic Chemistry, Synthesis for Biology & Medicine CDT); who recently submitted their entry to the RSC 1 minute video competition: The Importance of Chemistry to Human Health have been shortlisted to in the final six of the competition. Moses and Tom chose to focus on antibiotics and the way in which chemistry is being used as a tool to tackle the ever-increasing global threat of widespread antibiotic resistance. Professor Mark Maloney also features with a final take on this prominent issue. To watch the shortlisted videos and vote for the two DPhil students please see the link below.

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Nick Funnell wins UK Chemical Crystallography PrizeNick Funnell wins UK Chemical Crystallography Prize

Nick Funnell, an ERC-funded postdoc in the Goodwin group, has been awarded the CCDC Chemical Crystallography Prize for Young Scientists. This is the premier UK award for early-career researchers in the field of Chemical Crystallography; the award includes a monetary prize, a commemorative plaque, and an invited lecture at the British Crystallographic Association Spring Meeting. Nick has the added distinction of winning this award in the 50th year of the CSD. As a consequence he has been invited by the CCDC to present an plenary lecture at a special celebration of chemical crystallography to be held in Cambridge in July.

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Royal Society of Chemistry Outreach FundRoyal Society of Chemistry Outreach Fund

Drs Stewart and Birembaut successfully secured a grant from the RSC outreach fund to sponsor a one-day meeting to discuss outreach within the HE sector on the 15th of April. Oxford Chemistry engaged with over 6,000 students at outreach events last year and we feel we can do better! The meeting will attempt to discover novel ways to improve what we offer and will be attended by representatives from HEIs across the UK. There is still time to join us, so if interested, please register by completing the form on our website

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On the cover of CrystEngCommOn the cover of CrystEngComm

A method for predicting crystallinity of molecular materials by Jerome Wicker, a DPhil in the Cooper group, has been featured on the cover of CrystEngComm. The research uses large sets of data of known molecules and crystal structures to train machine learning algorithms to predict which will crystallise easily. The cover was design by Karl Harrison

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On the cover of ChemCommOn the cover of ChemComm

A new synthesis of ynamides developed by the Anderson group has been featured on the cover of Chemical Communications. This chemistry was developed by Steven Mansfield, a Part II student in the Anderson group, and solves many of the substrate limitations that have plagued the synthesis of this functional group, and employs a modular approach from cheap commercial starting materials. The cover art was produced by Karl Harrison

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The New Chemistry of the Elements - Meeting issueThe New Chemistry of the Elements - Meeting issue

In May 2014, a discussion meeting entitled "The new chemistry of the elements" took place – the first ever linking the Royal Society of Great Britain and the German Academy of Sciences, Leopoldina. The meeting confirmed and highlighted that the periodic table of the chemical elements still represents a significant signpost on the road to our understanding the structure of our natural world. The meeting also highlighted that the periodic table now underpins diverse multi-disciplinary research, inspiring and catalysing new advances and new avenues of research across the entire physical, biological and medical sciences.
Peter Edwards, one of the organisers of the meeting noted :
"The periodic table of the chemical elements is the most fundamental natural system of classification ever devised. There is an important parallel between Mendeleev’s discovery of the periodic table and Darwin’s discovery of evolution by natural selection in that both are logical constructs supported by scientific evidence which stimulate and catalyse further advances . These two theories were based on critical observations and brilliant intuition and premises that are correct enough both to withstand the test of time and to be built on in new areas of modern science. The meeting was a joy to attend and to be inspired by the remarkable progress one sees in the new science of the chemical elements across the periodic table."
This volume of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society was dedicated to the memory of Professor Jack Lewis FRS, Baron Lewis of Newnham, one of the father figures of the modern subject, who died last summer.
The cover is a representation of the modern periodic table of the chemical elements based on the covalent radii of the elements. Metallic and non-metallic status of the chemical elements taken from G. T. Seaborg, Dalton Trans., 1996, 3899. Credit: Karl Harrison, University of Oxford.

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