Department of Chemistry   University of Oxford

Spinning out success. 

The Department of Chemistry has an unrivalled track record in protecting and commercialising the innovative work of research staff. Oxford chemists have set up numerous commercial licences and spin-out companies to take promising technologies to market, often with the help of Isis Innovation, the University’s technology transfer company. Millions of pounds has been raised for the University as a result of spin-out activities from research carried out by Oxford chemists.

This success has been made possible in part through a partnership with IP2IPO, a company specialising in the commercialisation of university intellectual property rights. In return for an upfront sum which part-financed the new Chemistry Research Laboratory building, IP2IPO receives half of the University equity in Chemistry spin-outs for 15 years. Some of the Department of Chemistry’s established and up-and-coming companies are highlighted below, many set up with the help of IP2IPO funding.

Between 2008 and 2013, the support from Isis and IP2IPO enabled Oxford Chemistry to achieve 253 patent applications filed, with 201 granted; 30 technology licences executed leading to commercialisation; and 15 examples of sales of advanced materials and novel reagents.


OxSyBio (2014 onwards)

Research: Professor Hagan Bayley
Focus: 3D printing techniques to produce synthetic materials for wound healing and drug delivery, and in future even synthetic tissues for organ repair or replacement.

This new company has been set up to develop 3D printing techniques which can be used to produce synthetic materials for wound healing and drug delivery. The 3D droplet printing technology devised by Professor Hagan Bayley’s group is already able to print tissue-like materials from thousands of tiny water droplets, each coated in a thin film mimicking a living cell’s external membrane, and studded with protein pores so that they act like simplified cells. Electrical impulses can be transmitted through the networks of droplets in a similar way to cells in the nervous system. In the longer term the company aims to develop a printer that can create synthetic tissues for organ repair or replacement.

 

Oxford Advanced Conductors (OxACs) (2014 onwards)

Research: Professor Peter Edwards
Focus: Specialises in advanced materials and processes for production of high-performance optoelectronic thin film coatings for touch panel displays.

OxACs’ technology is based on over a decade of research by Peter Edwards' transparent conducting oxide research team. Touch screen displays are experiencing rapid market growth; however, most are based on indium, a rare and geopolitically sensitive material. OxACs has created a novel silicon-doped zinc oxide material (SiZOTM) to replace the indium oxide generally used in touch panel displays, at a fraction of the cost. It has also developed eco-friendly and sustainable manufacturing processes for the production of high-performance transparent conducting thin films coatings, and aims to significantly lower manufacturing costs for information display and related technologies.

 

Oxford Biotrans  (2013 onwards)

Research: Professor Luet Lok Wong
Focus: Enzyme-based techniques which can transform commonly available natural extracts into related flavour and fragrance compounds.

Oxford Biotrans is supported by over 15 years of enzyme research by Professor Luet Lok Wong, who has developed a technique using enzymes to transform commonly available natural extracts into related flavour and fragrance compounds. The process requires little energy and generates almost no waste in contrast to conventional chemical processes, and the end product is completely natural. Oxford Biotrans’ first product will be the grapefruit flavour and fragrance, nootkatone, which is difficult to extract from grapefruit and therefore expensive. The company will use enzymes to produce nootkatone from valencene, a widely-available natural compound obtained from oranges. The Oxford Biotrans technology also has potential applications in the production of pharmaceuticals, agrochemical and other speciality chemicals.

 

Oxford Advanced Surfaces plc (2006 onwards)

Research: Professor Mark Moloney and Dr Jon-Paul Griffiths
Focus: Onto™, which can bond with completely unreactive materials, allowing high-performance adhesion of advanced materials to surfaces.

Founded in 2006 by Professor Mark Moloney and Dr. Jon-Paul Griffiths, Oxford Advanced Surfaces (OAS) was set up to exploit their expertise in molecular synthetic design and formulation chemistry. Many advanced materials offer excellent properties such as light weight, chemical resistance and high strength, but their use in products containing laminate structures or coated parts is often limited because they cannot be strongly bonded to other materials. The company’s key technology, Onto™, was initially developed in the Department and has continued and expanded through OAS. Onto™ can bond with completely unreactive materials, allowing high-performance adhesion of ink to plastics, metallisation, or nanocoatings which change the functionality of a surface (e.g. its wetting properties).

 

Oxtox Ltd  (2006 onwards)

Research: Professor Richard Compton
Focus: Development of Drugsensor, an electrochemical device that can detect drugs in saliva and could be used by the police as a roadside drug-driving detector.

OxTox’s technology is based on electrochemical sensors invented by Professor Richard Compton’s group, who created a simple device capable of detecting the presence of cannabis in a small sample of saliva. OxTox is developing Drugsensor, a hand-held device which has the potential to be used by the police as a roadside drug-driving detector, just as breathalysers are currently used to test for alcohol. Drugsensor is easy to use and reliable, and this has helped to secure its place as the forerunner amongst its competitors in a recent study by the UK Home Office. OxTox is developing sensors to detect other drugs such as amphetamines, and currently has six patents at various stages of application.

 

Oxford Nanopore Technologies Ltd (2005 onwards)

Research: Professor Hagan Bayley
Focus: Currently poised to market two groundbreaking DNA sequencing devices (GridION and MinION ) based on nanopore sensing technology.

Based on research by Professor Hagan Bayley, Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) is at the forefront of the drive to transform DNA sequencing, which has a huge range of potential applications. The company is currently poised to market two groundbreaking DNA sequencing devices: GridION, about the size of a DVD player, and MinION, a miniaturised version the size of a USB memory stick. Both devices use nanopore sensing, in which molecules pass through nanopores set in an artificial membrane and create disruptions in electrical current which enable identification of the molecule in question. MinION is expected to retail at less than $1000, and the company calculates that 20 GridION nodes used together could sequence a human genome in 15 minutes. ONT has attracted high levels of investment.

 

Velocys plc (2005 onwards; formerly Oxford Catalysts Group)

Research: Professor Malcolm Green and Dr Tiancun Xiao
Focus: Smaller-scale reactors which can produce high-grade fuels from low-value and waste gas. A project with British Airways will convert waste biomass to jet fuel.

Velocys’ technology is underpinned by nearly two decades of world-leading research developed over 18 years at Oxford by Dr Tiancun Xiao, of the Wolfson Catalysis Centre and the Chemistry Department, and Professor Malcolm Green, of the Inorganic Chemistry Department. Spun out as Oxford Catalysts in 2005, the company makes reactors which are able to produce high-grade fuels from low-value and waste gas using the Fischer-Tropsch process, a collection of chemical reactions that convert a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen into liquid fuels. The reactors are small enough to transport in standard containers to where they are needed (e.g. remote gas fields). Several commercial-scale projects are underway, including one in partnership with British Airways which will convert waste biomass to jet fuel, providing enough fuel for BA’s entire operation at City Airport. In preparing to spin out Oxford Catalysts Ltd, the Oxford Enterprise Fellowship programme (run by the Oxford University Begbroke Science Park) awarded a Technology Enterprise Fellowship to Dr Xiao which allowed him to concentrate for a year on developing the technology and commercial interest.
See A5 flyer: Valuable liquid fuels from waste gas

 

Oxford Medical Diagnostics (2004 onwards; part of Avacta since 2008)

Research: Professor Gus Hancock
Focus: High sensitivity, laser-based, gas-detection technology, leading to the development of a breath test to measure blood ketones, and a sensor to detect water vapour in gas pipelines.

Oxford Medical Diagnostics (OMD) is a specialist in high sensitivity, laser-based, gas-detection technology, founded on the research of Professor Gus Hancock’s group. The technology has many applications in health and industry. The current focus of OMD’s work is the development of a breath test to indirectly measure blood ketones, which will assist type 1 diabetics with their condition and its complications. Other diseases such as TB may be amenable to similar testing. Hancock’s methods are also being applied to industrial gas sensing; OMD has a contract with Michell Instruments who are developing a laser-based sensor to detect water vapour in gas pipelines (a major cause of corrosion and blockages). In 2008 OMD was acquired by the Avacta Group for £3m.

 

Summit plc (2003 onwards; formerly VASTox)

Research: Professor Steve Davies
Focus: Development of a potentially groundbreaking new oral drug treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. The lead compound is now in clinical trials.

VASTox was spun out of the Department of Chemistry in 2003, initially using zebrafish to screen small molecules with drug potential, and then focusing on a potentially groundbreaking new treatment for Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Professor Steve Davies’ group designed and synthesised a large group of novel small-molecule compounds for use in Professor Kay Davies’ early work on DMD in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics. Screening led to the identification of a lead compound which is now in clinical trials; if successful, it will become the first oral drug treatment for DMD. The company is also pursuing a novel antibiotic treatment for Clostridium difficile infection.
See Oxford Researchers Working on New Drugs to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

 

Pharminox Ltd  (2002 onwards)

Research: Professor Gordon Lowe; Professor Malcolm Stevens (Nottingham)
Focus: Originally novel platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents, now alternative treatments for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common

Pharminox was formed to develop novel platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of ovarian, testicular and colorectal cancer, aimed at overcoming the side effects and resistance associated with currently available drugs. The discovery of the anti-tumour activity of these platinum complexes arose out of a fundamental study of the structure of DNA conducted by the late Professor Gordon Lowe. Subsequently Pharminox licensed technology relating to new anti-cancer molecules from the laboratory of Professor Malcolm Stevens at the University of Nottingham, and the company is now working on alternative treatments for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer. Pharminox has raised over $9m in investment.

 

Zyentia Ltd  (2002-2006)

Research: Professor Chris Dobson
Focus: Software to predict elements in proteins that lead to aggregation, a cause of many diseases and a problem for manufacturing of pure proteins. Sold to Lonza in 2006.

It is increasingly recognised that numerous diseases result from incorrect protein folding leading to aggregation of proteins in the body. Biotechnology companies trying to produce pure proteins run into similar problems; incorrectly folded proteins can be unstable and even toxic. Research by Professor Chris Dobson in the area of structural modification of proteins led to the spin-out of Zyentia in 2002. The company initially focused on the development of modified human calcitonin, a hormone that regulates bone density, used in the treatment of osteoporosis. Zyentia also developed software to predict elements in proteins that could lead to aggregation, and this was successfully sold to Lonza in 2006, who have since further developed and patented the approach.

 

Inhibox Ltd (2001 onwards)

Research: Professor Graham Richards
Focus: Scopius, the world's largest searchable virtual database of small molecules for drug discovery. InhibOx has pioneered the use of cloud computing for large-scale molecular modelling.

Key contributions to the field of computational chemistry for drug discovery have been made by InhibOx, a spin-out company based on the research of Professor Graham Richards, whose Screensaver Lifesaver project gave an early demonstratration of how the idle processing power of volunteers’ computers could be harnessed to screen huge numbers of molecules and assess their potential as cancer drug leads. InhibOx have developed Scopius, the world's largest searchable virtual database of small molecules (over 112 million compounds) and pioneered the use of cloud computing for large-scale molecular modelling. This helps to reduce the cost of identifying molecular leads for new drugs, and has opened up the early stages of drug development to smaller companies.

 

 

Oxford Asymmetry Int Plc (merged with Evotec in 2000)

Research: Professor Steve Davies
Focus: Drug development – designing and making novel chemical compounds for clients in the pharmaceutical industry to test, and refining those that showed promise.

Oxford Asymmetry International plc was formed from two companies spun out by Professor Steve Davies: Oxford Asymmetry Ltd (an asymmetric synthesis company), and Oxford Diversity Ltd (a combinatorial chemistry company). The company’s focus was on drug development, designing and making hundreds of thousands of novel chemical compounds for clients in the pharmaceutical industry to test, and then refining those that showed promise. It merged with Evotec Biosystems in December 2000 to become Evotec OAI, now a leading European company for the discovery and development of new drugs.

 

Oxford Molecular Group plc (1989; a subsidiary of Accelrys since 2001)

Research: Professor Graham Richards
Focus: Innovative chemical information management and decision-support software for researchers in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other chemical research industries.

In early 1970s, as computers were beginning to make an impact in scientific research, Graham Richards saw the potential for software to revolutionise areas such as drug discovery. His subsequent work on computer-based molecular modelling led to the spin-out of Oxford Molecular Group, which created innovative chemical information management and decision-support software for researchers in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, agrochemical and related chemical research industries. The company was floated successfully on the stock market in 1994 and became part of Pharmacopeia Inc.'s software subsidiary, Accelrys, in 2001. Accelrys is now a leader in cheminformatics, bioinformatics, and simulation software for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries, based in part on the Oxford technology it acquired.

 

MediSense  (1984 onwards; acquired by Abbott Laboratories in 1996)

Research: Professor Allen Hill
Focus: Development of a highly accurate electrochemical sensor to monitor blood glucose levels, which became a commercial home-use monitoring device for diabetics.

Research by Professor Allen Hill’s group into the electrochemistry of human enzymes led to the spin-out of MediSense and the development of a highly accurate sensor capable of monitoring blood glucose levels. The sensor detected levels of glucose oxidase, the enzyme responsible for glucose metabolism, and results could be obtained from a small drop of blood with no pre-treatment necessary, making it extremely suitable for a home-use monitoring device for diabetics. A commercial product was launched in 1989 and its success led to the sale of MediSense to Abbott in 1996 for £876m. Abbott have since further developed a range of meters for diabetics based on the original MediSense design. Whereas in the early eighties, there were essentially no electrochemical glucose sensors, now almost all the devices are electrochemical.


Pre-spinout

HydRegen

Research: Professor Kylie Vincent
Focus: A novel way of recycling the enzyme cofactor NADH, using cooperative sets of enzymes mounted on graphite beads. NADH is used extensively in enzyme-catalysed synthesis.


Other commercial activity

Calibration-free pH meter
Research: Professor Richard Compton
Commercialisation: technology licensed by Senova Systems
Focus: a new pH sensor platform deploying patented chemistries coupled with advanced materials and proprietary electronics. Developers Senova previewed the pHit Scanner in 2012, and are now developing a commercial product.
See A5 flyer: A revolution in pH measurement. See also technology for licensing: New approach to pH sensing and Solid-state pH sensor technology licensed by Phathom Nanosensors

Garlic sensor
Research: Professor Richard Compton
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a simple electrochemical means for detecting and quantifying diallyldisulfide, the best indicator of the strength of garlic.

Chilli pepper sensor
Research: Professor Richard Compton
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a sensitive electroanalytical methodology for the determination of capsaicin (responsible for the ‘heat’ in foodstuffs) using adsorptive stripping voltammetry with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) based electrodes. This technology is licensed to the English Provender Company in the UK, and Singapore-based company Bio-X who are creating a hand-held chilli sensor.

Electrochemical detection of tagged nanoparticles
Research: Professor Richard Compton
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: an electrochemical detection technique based on particle coulometry. The technology allows the nanoparticle label to be modified and also to be detected in suspension, and is proposed to be of use in sensing or biosensing applications.

Electrochemical detection of silver nanoparticles; Nanoparticle detection
Research: Professor Richard Compton
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a fast and accurate method for the measurement of nanoparticles in a variety of samples.

Simplified screening test for cystic fibrosis
Research: Professor Richard Compton
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: electrochemical methods for the determination of chloride ions; could be developed into a point-of-care system for preliminary screening of cystic fibrosis (CF) that would be fast and accurate, as well as being simple to use and interpret.

Gas sensors
Research: Professor Richard Compton
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: modified carbon-based electrochemical sensors that offer high sensitivity, improved selectivity and longer lifetimes. The sensors are appropriate for a range of gases and are also suited to low cost manufacturing techniques.

Real world arsenic detection
Research: Professor Richard Compton
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a low-cost method of detecting arsenic that could be developed into a test to measure arsenic in the field.

Assays for anti-cancer agents
Research: Professor Christopher Schofield
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a method for identifying inhibitors which can act against the cancer target Mina53. Such inhibitors will be useful in treating colon tumours and oesophageal cancer.

Identifying new metabolic disease therapies
Research: Professor Christopher Schofield
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: new assays to screen for potential drug candidates against metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

Obesity assay
Research: Professor Christopher Schofield
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a range of assays, which can be used in identifying and developing pharmaceutical (drug) candidates against FTO enzyme, a promising target for anti-obesity drugs.

Boron alloys for hydrogen storage applications
Research: Professors Peter Edwards and William David
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: synthetic routes to novel mixed alkali metal borohydrides. The new materials have proved to be effective hydrogen stores with increased hydrogen density, reduced decomposition temperatures and increased cycles.

Low cost transparent conductors
Research: Professor Peter Edwards
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: silicon doped zinc oxide thin films deposited by solution phase technique, showing high conductivity, high transparency and low haze and suited to a wide variety of applications.

Carbon dioxide to methanol process
Research: Professor Dermot O'Hare
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a new process to convert CO2, a greenhouse gas produced in huge quantities industrially, into methanol, a useful solvent and green fuel.

Inorganic adjuvants and immune modulators
Research: Professor Dermot O'Hare
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a novel class of inorganic vaccine adjuvants and immune modulators that have highly predictable attributes and can be designed to produce specific immunological responses.

New biomass to methanol catalyst
Research: Professor Edman Tsang
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a new catalytic process to convert ethylene glycol directly into lower alcohols. Operating at relatively low pressure and low temperature, the process offers the exciting possibility of advancing the use of lower alcohols as green fuels.

New biomass to methanol process
Research: Professor Edman Tsang
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a new catalytic process to convert glycerol, the main by-product of biodiesel production, into methanol.

Methanol to hydrogen
Research: Professor Edman Tsang
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: this technology would allow the use of methanol, which is relatively safe and simple to transport, as a fuel for hydrogen-powered equipment.

Alkenes as chiral building blocks
Research: Dr Stephen Fletcher
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: this technology offers a flexible new method for creating chiral centres from low-cost starting materials.

Creating new chiral carbon centres
Research: Dr Stephen Fletcher
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a robust and simple process that allows highly enantioselective carbon-carbon bond formation, opening up entirely new syntheses not possible using existing methods.

Drug discovery software: ultrafast shape recognition (USR)
Research: Professor Graham Richards
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: USR software provides a non-superposition based method for comparing molecules. Using this method, molecular shape is characterised by a set of 1D distributions of inter-atom distances, which retain 3D shape information.

Single site polymerisation catalyst
Research: Professor Philip Mountford
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a system for homopolymerisation of ethylene combining the catalyst with the activator in one compound – a single site catalyst.

Anti-cancer drug discovery
Research: Professor Dame Carol Robinson
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: provides new tools for identifying drugs against novel cancer targets.

MASSIGN: mass spectrometry method and software
Research: Professor Dame Carol Robinson
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a methodology and software tool to assist in the understanding of complicated mass spectra from large complexes.

Drug candidate identification
Research: Professor Dame Carol Robinson
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a native mass spectrometry method that detects binding of small molecule drug candidates to membrane proteins.

Improved mass resolution and ion throughput in ToF mass spectrometry
Research: Professors Claire Vallance and Mark Brouard
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a simple to implement invention which couples fast detectors with time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometry in order to improve total ion throughput and time (and correspondingly mass) resolution.

Pixel imaging mass spectrometry
Research: Professors Claire Vallance and Mark Brouard
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a new variation on (ToF) mass spectrometry, which uses a modified ion lens assembly and detector to obtain mass-selective images of the spatial or velocity distribution of the ions at their point of formation.

Faster, brighter scintillators
Research: Professors Claire Vallance and Mark Brouard
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a new range of scintillators: shorter intensity decay lifetimes mean improved time resolution. For time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry this relates directly to desired improvements in mass resolution.

Ion detector
Research: Professors Claire Vallance and Mark Brouard
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a new type of ion detector which offers a number of advantages: fully-integrated position sensitive ion detector eliminates the need for MCPs and phosphors; improved time resolution performance over MCP/phosphor combination; superior ion detection efficiency without the loss of spatial resolution or added complexity of comparable MCP-based approaches; more robust detector solution which can operate at higher pressures (up to atmospheric) and without the need for a high voltage power supply.

Tuneable Optical Filter
Research: Professor Claire Vallance & Photonic Nanomaterials Group, Department of Materials
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a compact tuneable optical filter for use in spectroscopy applications; offers a transmission bandwidth of approximately 0.01-1nm and can complete continuous tuning of a single transmission line over a range of up to 100nm.

On-chip optical sensor platform
Research: Professor Claire Vallance & Photonic Nanomaterials Group, Department of Materials
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a flexible chip-based sensor based on optical cavities.

Miniature tuneable dye laser
Research: Professor Claire Vallance & Photonic Nanomaterials Group, Department of Materials
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a dye laser based on optical micro-cavities.

Improving protein drugs with smart chemistry
Research: Professor Ben Davis
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: The Oxford toolkit - a group of enzymatic and chemical methods that enable proteins to be modified in a very specific and controllable manner.

Targeted image contrast agent
Research: Professor Ben Davis
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: imaging agent provides extremely sensitive imaging that is far superior to that obtained with existing imaging agents; the invention could potentially provide much advancement for the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis and other inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system.

Improved inflammation imaging
Research: Professor Ben Davis
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: new imaging agents to diagnose diseases associated with endothelial activation, eg inflammatory diseases such as MS & atherosclerosis.

Biodegradable MRI imaging agents
Research: Professor Ben Davis
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: multimeric, biodegradable, imaging agents for MRI that can amongst other things, target lesions in the blood brain barrier.

Tuberculosis detection
Research: Professor Ben Davis
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: improved TB detection using trehalose probes to monitor mycobacterial growth and infection by many imaging modalities.

Improved hydrogen generation method
Research: Professor John Foord
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a way to prepare silicon to make it suitably reactive for sustained local generation of hydrogen; this new invention significantly improves the hydrogen yield (>90 percent of theoretical) and rate of generation to commercially highly attractive levels.

Measuring hydrogen sulphide
Research: Professor Stephen Faulkner
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: a fluorescent proprietary molecule for the detection of hydrogen sulphide particularly suitable for analysis of liquid samples.

Breath-by-breath respiratory gas analyser
Research: Professors Gus Hancock and Grant Ritchie
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: an apparatus for ‘in-line’ analysis that uses laser spectroscopy to measure directly the concentration of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapour in a breathing tube.

Efficient cofactor regeneration
Research: Professor Kylie Vincent
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: facilitates the use of enzyme-catalysed steps in reactions such as stereoselective aldehyde reduction; potential to reduce the manufacturing cost for pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries.

Novel small molecule cannabinoid agonists
Research: Professor Angela Russell
Commercialisation: technology for licensing
Focus: small molecule agonists that target CB2 and have potential use in diseases with an inflammatory component.

 

Material & Reagent Sales

2,5 dibromohexane diamide/2,3diiodo hexanediamide hybridoma: Reagents for the mild conversion of cysteine to dehydroalanine
Research: Professors Christopher Schofield and Ben Davis

FITC-Trehalose: Probe for the detection of live mycobacteria
Research: Professor Ben Davis


Previous spin-outs

ReOx Ltd (2003)
Research: Professor Christopher Schofield
Focus: drug discovery technology to develop novel treatments for disease by controlling the activity of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)

Glycoform Ltd (2002; wound up 2010)
Research: Professor Ben Davis & Dr Antony Fairbanks
Focus: the development of an advanced drug delivery system based on harnessing the way carbohydrates specifically target cell receptors; and the glycosylation of protein drugs - the attachment of carbohydrates to proteins to improve their drug characteristics

Oxford BioSensors Ltd (2000; liquidated 2009)

PowderJect Pharmaceuticals Plc (1993; acquired by Chiron Corporation 2003)

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